The One, The Only Ruger 10/22. The Hell Is Wrong with Thompson/Center?

I do not know many people who do not, or have not, owned a Ruger 10/22. I was going to say “firearm enthusiasts”, but the 10/22 has so much utility you don’t have to be dedicated enthusiast to own one. This article addressing the pictured Ruger 10/22 is open to public access on RealGuns.Com and requires no member account to read https://www.realguns.com/articles/998.htm .

Thompson/Center has not has a good idea in firearms since acquired by Smith & Wesson. Where there is an attempt at Innovation, there has been no effective campaigns to support, or products were not readily available, or they have been quickly discontinued. Where there has been longevity, firearms are cheaply made, low priced and lack pride of ownership. A huge departure from the old days T/C that brought unique designs.

It is common in all industries to imitate successful products, features and style, but this is the first time I have seen a large company copy another another company’s product to the extent piece parts are interchangeable. This is the case with the T/CR22 which, in my opinion, just copies the Ruger 10/22 without effort toward innovation.

Can S&W’s Thompson/Center copy another company’s design? Perhaps they can. Perhaps a lapse in patent law provided the opportunity. Perhaps they found something in the way aftermarket companies have been producing systems and piece part accessories for the Ruger 10/22… solely conjecture on my part. But the direction, like so many bad things that are on public display in this country these days, smacks of people and companies just doing the wrong thing.

Why buy an imitation when you can buy the real thing? I’ve read some of the reviews of the T/CR22 and it is amazing how fickle the firearm press is in their pronouncement of the T/CR22 with glowing reviews of major enhancements which would be fine, if they weren’t total BS; panning for ad dollars.

After reviewing the T/CR22 I found the primary appeal held by the T/CR22 is that Smith & Wesson and T/C are virtually giving them away to take market share away from Ruger. It is an OK product, but why wouldn’t it be. It duplicates the most successful rimfire ever made.

What about Talking Conservatively’s similarities to Facebook? The producers of the site operates a web interface propagated messaging service, including personalized discussion groups, for more than a decade before Facebook existed.

Leave a Reply

Talking Conservatively

Talking Conservatively

Talking Conservatively